Common logos in the addiction treatment space are often soft in their color palette using earthy colors such as greens, yellows, light blues and whites. It’s also not uncommon for treatment centers to use elements such as water and sunshine and earthly objects such as birds and trees as a part of their logo brand identifiers.

Your treatment center may target unique patient types such as “women only” and “men only” centers as examples. Of the hundreds of sites we’ve evaluated over the years, women-focused treatment sites typically have lighter colors in pinks and reds with other softer color palette utilization used beyond that. This is not to say these are the ONLY colors we’ve seen since they do vary greatly in certain cases, but this type of color palette appears to be the most common.

 

 

 

 

For men-focused treatment sites, we’ve seen this segment run the gambit from hard-hitting dark green and black for an almost militaristic/boot camp style to darker colors utilizing purples, blues, and greys to standard colors often found with sites not purely focused on one patient type.

 

 

 

 

You have one shot at a first impression, so don’t run the risk by putting a rush-job on developing a logo. It’s very important that your addiction treatment center’s logo conveys trust and gives people a sense of hope in their time of need.

The first thing your center should do is figure out who your target audience is and once that’s been established, go through the ideation phase of determining a color palette and theme-type (ocean, sunshine, trees, flowers, etc. or no theme at all).

The second item on your list should be to find an individual, an agency, or a crowdsourcing platform to get your logo developed.

Hiring an agency or an individual to develop a new logo should not be your first consideration. Why? Because there are crowdsourcing platforms that offer you the opportunity to have people from all over the world help you develop your logo and brand. After all, getting 50+ logo submissions from a few dozen talented graphic designers sounds a lot better than getting only a handful of comps from an agency or individual, doesn’t it?

If you’re inclined to hire an individual or agency, do yourself a favor and ask for their portfolio or previous logo work to gauge their design capabilities and its breadth of uniqueness. Also, be sure to interview them to really get to know how they think and their processes in general.

If you go the route of crowdsourcing, we highly recommend LogoTournament.com since they’re one of the longest-running platforms out there and have never disappointed any clients we’ve sent their way (which has been quite a few).

Once your logo has been developed, you can begin to leverage it in your marketing plan.

Parting Note:

Like we said, there’s never a second chance for a first impression, so make sure you align your brand logo with your target audience in mind. And do yourself a favor and put your ego aside a bit during the development phase by asking for feedback from others as you go through the development phrase. After all, several minds are far greater than one. ;)